Phyllis Webstad (nee Jack) is Northern Secwepemc (Shuswap) from the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation (Canoe Creek/Dog Creek). She comes from mixed Secwepemc and European ancestry. Born in Dog Creek, Phyllis is married, has one son, a step-son, five grandchildren, and now lives in Williams Lake, BC. Phyllis earned diplomas in both Business Administration and Accounting and is the Executive Director of the Orange Shirt Society. The author of multiple books, she tours the country telling her story and raising awareness about the impacts of the Residential School System. Her simple orange shirt has become a conversation starter for all aspects of Residential School across Canada and beyond.

Illustrated by: Emily Kewageshig 

Translated by: Marie-Christine Payette

Phyllis Webstad (nee Jack) is Northern Secwepemc (Shuswap) from the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation (Canoe Creek/Dog Creek). She comes from mixed Secwepemc and European ancestry. Born in Dog Creek, Phyllis is married, has one son, a step-son, five grandchildren, and now lives in Williams Lake, BC. Phyllis earned diplomas in both Business Administration and Accounting and is the Executive Director of the Orange Shirt Society. The author of multiple books, she tours the country telling her story and raising awareness about the impacts of the Residential School System. Her simple orange shirt has become a conversation starter for all aspects of Residential School across Canada and beyond.

Phyllis Webstad (nee Jack) is Northern Secwepemc (Shuswap) from the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation (Canoe Creek Indian Band). She comes from mixed Secwepemc and Irish/French heritage. She was born in Dog Creek and lives in Williams Lake, BC, Canada. Through sharing her personal Orange Shirt Story, Phyllis has inspired thousands of people to honour Residential School Survivors and their families and share the call on September 30th of each year that “EVERY CHILD MATTERS.” Phyllis is well respected for her work, her courage and for striving to heal our communities and Nation through speaking her truth.

 

 

Phyllis Webstad (nee Jack) is Northern Secwepemc (Shuswap) from the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation (Canoe Creek Indian Band). She comes from mixed Secwepemc and Irish/French heritage. She was born in Dog Creek and lives in Williams Lake, BC, Canada. Through sharing her personal Orange Shirt Story, Phyllis has inspired thousands of people to honour Residential School Survivors and their families and share the call on September 30th of each year that “EVERY CHILD MATTERS.” Phyllis is well respected for her work, her courage and for striving to heal our communities and Nation through speaking her truth.

Illustrated by Karlene Harvey (Tsilhqot’in, Syilx, and a mix of European ancestry)

Art work by Simone Diamond, Coast Salish Nation

“I create art that connects me to my family, our traditions and our spirit of continuity.”

September 30th marks ORANGE SHIRT DAY: Every Child Matters​, Canada’s National Day for Truth and Reconciliation a day of remembrance and respect to honour the students and survivors of Canada’s Residential School system.

On this day, Canadians are encouraged to wear an orange shirt to show their support for survivors and pay respects to those who did not make it and their families.

Art work by Simone Diamond, Coast Salish Nation

“I create art that connects me to my family, our traditions and our spirit of continuity.”

September 30th marks ORANGE SHIRT DAY: Every Child Matters​, Canada’s National Day for Truth and Reconciliation a day of remembrance and respect to honour the students and survivors of Canada’s Residential School system.

On this day, Canadians are encouraged to wear an orange shirt to show their support for survivors and pay respects to those who did not make it home, and their families.

Art work by Morgan Asoyuf, Tsimshian Nation

“Art is an intimate connection to our history, identity and our community. I am honoured to continue our traditions and to share them.”

September 30th marks ORANGE SHIRT DAY: Every Child Matters​, Canada’s National Day for Truth and Reconciliation a day of remembrance and respect to honour the students and survivors of Canada’s Residential School system.

On this day, Canadians are encouraged to wear an orange shirt to show their support for survivors and pay respects to those who did not make it and their families.

Art work by Morgan Asoyuf, Tsimshian Nation

“Art is an intimate connection to our history, identity and our community. I am honoured to continue our traditions and to share them.”

September 30th marks ORANGE SHIRT DAY: Every Child Matters​, Canada’s National Day for Truth and Reconciliation a day of remembrance and respect to honour the students and survivors of Canada’s Residential School system.

On this day, Canadians are encouraged to wear an orange shirt to show their support for survivors and pay respects to those who did not make it and their families.

Art work by Morgan Asoyuf, Tsimshian Nation

“Art is an intimate connection to our history, identity and our community. I am honoured to continue our traditions and to share them.”

September 30th marks ORANGE SHIRT DAY: Every Child Matters​, Canada’s National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, a day of remembrance and respect to honour the students and survivors of Canada’s Residential School system.

On this day, Canadians are encouraged to wear an orange shirt to show their support for survivors and pay respects to those who did not make it home, and their families.

Phyllis Webstad (nee Jack) is Northern Secwepemc (Shuswap) from the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation (Canoe Creek/Dog Creek). She comes from mixed Secwepemc and European ancestry. Born in Dog Creek, Phyllis is married, has one son, a step-son, five grandchildren, and now lives in Williams Lake, BC. Phyllis earned diplomas in both Business Administration and Accounting and is the Executive Director of the Orange Shirt Society. The author of multiple books, she tours the country telling her story and raising awareness about the impacts of the Residential School System. Her simple orange shirt has become a conversation starter for all aspects of Residential School across Canada and beyond.

Phyllis Webstad (nee Jack) is Northern Secwepemc (Shuswap) from the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation (Canoe Creek Indian Band). She comes from mixed Secwepemc and Irish/French heritage. She was born in Dog Creek and lives in Williams Lake, BC, Canada. In 2018 Phyllis Webstad launched her children’s book called “The Orange Shirt Story” to share her story in her own words. The Orange shirt story tells the story of young Phyllis having her orange shirt taken away on her first day of residential school and never to see it again. A simple orange shirt has become a conversation starter for all aspects of residential school across Canada and beyond. Phyllis has inspired thousands and thousands of people to honour residential school survivors and their families and share the call on September 30th of each year that “EVERY CHILD MATTERS.” Phyllis is well respected for her work, her courage and for striving to heal our communities and Nation through speaking her truth.

The Orange Shirt Society is a nonprofit society, based in Williams Lake, BC that guides the Orange Shirt Day movement. The purposes of The Society are:

1. To support Indian Residential School reconciliation.

2. To create awareness of the individual, family and community intergenerational impacts of Indian Residential Schools through Orange Shirt Society activities.

3. To create awareness of the concept of “Every Child Matters”.

Phyllis Webstad (nee Jack) is Northern Secwepemc (Shuswap) from the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation (Canoe Creek Indian Band). She comes from mixed Secwepemc and Irish/French heritage. She was born in Dog Creek and lives in Williams Lake, BC, Canada. In 2018 Phyllis Webstad launched her children’s book called “The Orange Shirt Story” to share her story in her own words. The Orange shirt story tells the story of young Phyllis having her orange shirt taken away on her first day of residential school and never to see it again. A simple orange shirt has become a conversation starter for all aspects of residential school across Canada and beyond. Phyllis has inspired thousands and thousands of people to honour residential school survivors and their families and share the call on September 30th of each year that “EVERY CHILD MATTERS.” Phyllis is well respected for her work, her courage and for striving to heal our communities and Nation through speaking her truth.

The Orange Shirt Society is a nonprofit society, based in Williams Lake, BC that guides the Orange Shirt Day movement. The purposes of The Society are:

1. To support Indian Residential School reconciliation.

2. To create awareness of the individual, family and community intergenerational impacts of Indian Residential Schools through Orange Shirt Society activities.

3. To create awareness of the concept of “Every Child Matters”.