Phyllis’s Orange Shirt

Phyllis Webstad

$11.95

Available on backorder

September 30th has been declared Orange Shirt Day annually, in recognition of the harm the residential school system did to children’s sense of self-esteem and well being, and as an affirmation of the commitment to ensure that everyone matters.

When Phyllis Webstad (nee Jack) turned six, she went to the residential school for the first time. On her first day at school, she wore a shiny orange shirt that her Granny had bought for her, but when she got to the school, it was taken away from her and never returned. This is the true story of Phyllis and her orange shirt. It is also the story of Orange Shirt Day.

To Phyllis the colour orange was a symbol that she did not matter. Today she has learned to accept the colour and even have fun with it and now the orange shirt has become a symbol of hope and reconciliation. By wearing an orange shirt on Orange Shirt Day, you make a powerful statement that residential schools were wrong and commit to the concept that EVERY CHILD MATTERS.

This book is also available in French.

Recommended for ages 4-6.

The Royal Museum Shop is operated by the Royal BC Museum Foundation. All proceeds from the sale of merchandise go directly towards supporting the many fine programs and special events at the Royal BC Museum.

September 2019, HC, 30 pages

ISBN 9781989122242

You may also like…

Description

Phyllis Webstad (nee Jack) is Northern Secwepemc (Shuswap) from the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation (Canoe Creek Indian Band). She comes from mixed Secwepemc and Irish/French heritage. She was born in Dog Creek and lives in Williams Lake, BC, Canada. In 2018 Phyllis Webstad launched her children’s book called “The Orange Shirt Story” to share her story in her own words. The Orange shirt story tells the story of young Phyllis having her orange shirt taken away on her first day of residential school and never to see it again. A simple orange shirt has become a conversation starter for all aspects of residential school across Canada and beyond. Phyllis has inspired thousands and thousands of people to honour residential school survivors and their families and share the call on September 30th of each year that “EVERY CHILD MATTERS.” Phyllis is well respected for her work, her courage and for striving to heal our communities and Nation through speaking her truth.

The Orange Shirt Society is a nonprofit society, based in Williams Lake, BC that guides the Orange Shirt Day movement. The purposes of The Society are:

1. To support Indian Residential School reconciliation.

2. To create awareness of the individual, family and community intergenerational impacts of Indian Residential Schools through Orange Shirt Society activities.

3. To create awareness of the concept of “Every Child Matters”.

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Be the first to review “Phyllis’s Orange Shirt”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *